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Skin self-exam

Skin cancer - self-exam; Melanoma - self-exam; Basal cell cancer - self-exam; Squamous cell - self-exam; Skin mole - self-exam

Doing a skin self-exam involves checking your skin for any unusual growths or skin changes. A skin self-exam helps find many skin problems early. Finding skin cancer early may give you a better chance for being cured.

How to do a Skin Self-exam

Checking your skin regularly can help you notice any unusual changes. Follow your health care provider's recommendations on how often to check your skin.

These tips may be helpful:

  • The easiest time to do the exam may be after you bathe or shower.
  • If you are a woman and do regular breast self-exams, this is also a good time to check your skin.
  • If possible, use a full-length mirror in a room with bright lights so you can see your entire body.

Look for these things when doing a skin self-exam:

New skin markings:

  • Bumps
  • Moles
  • Blemishes
  • Changes in color

Moles that have changed in:

  • Size
  • Texture
  • Color
  • Shape

Also look for "ugly duckling" moles. These are moles that look and feel different from other nearby moles.

Moles with:

  • Uneven edges
  • Differences in color or asymmetric colors
  • Lack of even sides (look different from one side to the other)

Also look for:

  • Moles or sores that continue to bleed or will not heal
  • Any mole or growth that looks very different from other skin growths around them

To do a skin self-exam:

  • Look closely at your entire body, both front and back, in the mirror.
  • Check under your arms and on both sides of each arm. Be sure to look at the backs of your upper arms, which can be hard to see.
  • Bend your arms at the elbow, and look at both sides of your forearm.
  • Look at the tops and palms of your hands.
  • Look at the front and back of both legs.
  • Look at your buttocks and between your buttocks.
  • Examine your genital area.
  • Look at your face, neck, back of your neck, and scalp. Use both a hand mirror and full-length mirror, along with a comb, to see areas of your scalp.
  • Look at your feet, including the soles and the spaces between your toes.
  • Have a person you trust help examine hard-to-see areas.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Tell your provider right away if:

  • You have any new or unusual sores or spots on your skin
  • A mole or skin sore changes in shape, size, color, or texture
  • Spot an ugly duckling mole
  • You have a sore that does not heal

References

American Academy of Dermatology website. Detect skin cancer: how to perform a skin self-exam. www.aad.org/public/diseases/skin-cancer/find/check-skin. Accessed December 17, 2019.

National Cancer Institute website. Skin cancer screening (PDQ) - health professional version. www.cancer.gov/types/skin/hp/skin-screening-pdq. Updated March 11, 2020. Accessed March 24, 2020.

US Preventive Services Task Force, Bibbins-Domingo K, Grossman DC, Grossman DC, et al. Screening for skin cancer: US Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. JAMA. 2016;316(4):429-435. PMID: 27458948 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27458948.

    • Melanoma

      Animation

    •  

      Melanoma - Animation

      You've noticed a mole, sore, or growth on your skin that doesn't look right. It might be a melanoma and time to see a doctor. Melanoma is skin cancer caused by changes in cells called melanocytes. These cells make a skin pigment called melanin. Melanin's what gives you your skin and hair color. Melanoma can appear on normal skin, or it may begin as a mole or other area that has changed in appearance. Some moles you have when you're born can develop into melanoma. There are four types, superficial spreading melanoma is the most common. It's usually flat and irregular in shape and color, with different shades of black and brown. It's most common in Caucasians. Nodular melanoma usually starts as a raised area that is dark blackish-blue or maybe bluish-red. Lentigo melanoma usually occurs in older adults. It's more common on sun-damaged skin on your face, neck, and arms. It's usually large, flat, and tan, with areas of brown. Lastly, acral lentigenous melanoma is the least common form. It usually occurs on your palms, soles, or under your nails. And it's more common in African-Americans. The risk of developing melanoma increases with age, but it is often also seen in young people. You are more likely to get melanoma if you have fair skin, blue or green eyes, or red or blond hair. People who live in sunny climates or at high altitudes are also at risk. As are people who spend a lot of time in the sun, or had one or more blistering sunburns during childhood, or use tanning devices. So, how do you know you have melanoma? You may have a mole, sore, lump, or growth on your skin that just doesn't look right. You may notice a sore or growth that bleeds or changes color. One half of the growth may be different from the other. The edges of the growth may be irregular. The color of the growth may change from one area to another. The spot may be larger than 6mm in diameter, about the size of a pencil eraser. The mole may keep changing in appearance. So, what do you do about melanoma? To treat melanoma successfully, you have to recognize the symptoms early. Make sure somebody sees all of your skin at least once a year and pay attention to your own skin. Call your doctor if you notice anything unusual. Your doctor will examine your skin for size, shape, color, and texture of any suspicious areas. If your doctor thinks you may have skin cancer, you'll have a piece of skin removed and sent to a laboratory for testing. This is called a biopsy. You may also have a lymph node biopsy to see if the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes. If you are diagnosed with melanoma, you may have other tests to see if the cancer has spread further. You will need surgery if you have melanoma. The doctor will remove the skin cancer and some of the surrounding tissue. If the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes they will also be removed. After surgery, you may need medicine called interferon. If the cancer has spread to organs, it may not be able to be cured. Treatment then might focus on shrinking the cancer and making you as comfortable as possible. You may need chemotherapy, immunotherapy, radiation treatment, and more surgery. Caught early, some of the types of melanoma can be cured. Melanoma that is very deep or has already spread to lymph nodes is more likely to return after treatment. And the odds are even worse if it has spread farther to other organs. If you have melanoma and recovered, it's important you continue to examine your body for any unusual changes because the cancer may return many years later. One more reason that the earlier you catch it the better.

    • Melanoma

      Animation

    •  

      Melanoma - Animation

      You've noticed a mole, sore, or growth on your skin that doesn't look right. It might be a melanoma and time to see a doctor. Melanoma is skin cancer caused by changes in cells called melanocytes. These cells make a skin pigment called melanin. Melanin's what gives you your skin and hair color. Melanoma can appear on normal skin, or it may begin as a mole or other area that has changed in appearance. Some moles you have when you're born can develop into melanoma. There are four types, superficial spreading melanoma is the most common. It's usually flat and irregular in shape and color, with different shades of black and brown. It's most common in Caucasians. Nodular melanoma usually starts as a raised area that is dark blackish-blue or maybe bluish-red. Lentigo melanoma usually occurs in older adults. It's more common on sun-damaged skin on your face, neck, and arms. It's usually large, flat, and tan, with areas of brown. Lastly, acral lentigenous melanoma is the least common form. It usually occurs on your palms, soles, or under your nails. And it's more common in African-Americans. The risk of developing melanoma increases with age, but it is often also seen in young people. You are more likely to get melanoma if you have fair skin, blue or green eyes, or red or blond hair. People who live in sunny climates or at high altitudes are also at risk. As are people who spend a lot of time in the sun, or had one or more blistering sunburns during childhood, or use tanning devices. So, how do you know you have melanoma? You may have a mole, sore, lump, or growth on your skin that just doesn't look right. You may notice a sore or growth that bleeds or changes color. One half of the growth may be different from the other. The edges of the growth may be irregular. The color of the growth may change from one area to another. The spot may be larger than 6mm in diameter, about the size of a pencil eraser. The mole may keep changing in appearance. So, what do you do about melanoma? To treat melanoma successfully, you have to recognize the symptoms early. Make sure somebody sees all of your skin at least once a year and pay attention to your own skin. Call your doctor if you notice anything unusual. Your doctor will examine your skin for size, shape, color, and texture of any suspicious areas. If your doctor thinks you may have skin cancer, you'll have a piece of skin removed and sent to a laboratory for testing. This is called a biopsy. You may also have a lymph node biopsy to see if the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes. If you are diagnosed with melanoma, you may have other tests to see if the cancer has spread further. You will need surgery if you have melanoma. The doctor will remove the skin cancer and some of the surrounding tissue. If the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes they will also be removed. After surgery, you may need medicine called interferon. If the cancer has spread to organs, it may not be able to be cured. Treatment then might focus on shrinking the cancer and making you as comfortable as possible. You may need chemotherapy, immunotherapy, radiation treatment, and more surgery. Caught early, some of the types of melanoma can be cured. Melanoma that is very deep or has already spread to lymph nodes is more likely to return after treatment. And the odds are even worse if it has spread farther to other organs. If you have melanoma and recovered, it's important you continue to examine your body for any unusual changes because the cancer may return many years later. One more reason that the earlier you catch it the better.

      A Closer Look

       

      Self Care

       

      Tests for Skin self-exam

       

      Review Date: 9/30/2019

      Reviewed By: Michael Lehrer, MD, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Dermatology, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

      The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., a business unit of Ebix, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
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