Healthcare Library

Surgeries, Tests and Treatments

Oropharynx lesion biopsy

Throat lesion biopsy; Biopsy - mouth or throat; Mouth lesion biopsy; Oral cancer - biopsy

An oropharynx lesion biopsy is surgery in which tissue from an abnormal growth or mouth sore is removed and checked for problems.

How the Test is Performed

Painkiller or numbing medicine is first applied to the area. For large sores or sores of the throat, general anesthesia may be needed. This means you will be asleep during the procedure.

All or part of the problem area (lesion) is removed. It is sent to the laboratory to check for problems. If a growth in the mouth or throat needs to be removed, the biopsy will be done first. This is followed by the actual removal of the growth.

How to Prepare for the Test

If a simple painkiller or local numbing medicine is to be used, there is no special preparation. If the test is part of a growth removal or if general anesthesia is used, you will likely be asked not to eat for 6 to 8 hours before the test.

How the Test will Feel

You may feel pressure or tugging while the tissue is being removed. After the numbness wears off, the area may be sore for a few days.

Why the Test is Performed

This test is done to determine the cause of a sore (lesion) in the throat.

Normal Results

This test is only done when there is an abnormal tissue area.

What Abnormal Results Mean

Abnormal results may mean:

  • Cancer (such as squamous cell carcinoma)
  • Benign lesions (such as papilloma)
  • Fungal infections (such as candida)
  • Histoplasmosis
  • Oral lichen planus
  • Precancerous sore (leukoplakia)
  • Viral infections (such as Herpes simplex)
Risks

Risks of the procedure may include:

  • Infection of the site
  • Bleeding at the site

If there is bleeding, the blood vessels may be sealed (cauterized) with an electric current or laser.

Considerations

Avoid hot or spicy food after the biopsy.

References

Lee FE-H, Treanor JJ. Viral infections. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, Ernst JD, et al, eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap 32.

Sinha P, Harreus U. Malignant neoplasms of the oropharynx. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund V, et al, eds. Cummings Otolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 97.

Review Date: 11/4/2018

Reviewed By: Josef Shargorodsky, MD, MPH, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

The information provided herein should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Links to other sites are provided for information only -- they do not constitute endorsements of those other sites. © 1997- A.D.A.M., a business unit of Ebix, Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.
© 1997- adam.com All rights reserved.

 
 
 

 

 

ways to give

view all

news room

view all

healthcare library

view all
Event Calendar

Hunterdon Healthcare offers an array of educational events, including childbirth, healthy living and fitness classes.

LEARN MORE
Health and Wellness Centers

Where health and fitness meet to help you stay healthy at every age.

LEARN MORE
Heart & Vascular

Heart and Vascular Services Department brings world-class cardiovascular care to our community.

LEARN MORE